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COMICS PRESSING?!?!?! Options
stevetuk
Posted: Tuesday, July 07, 2009 11:55:42 AM

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http://comicnews.info/?p=8016

So apparently now putting your comics in a hot press (i.e. ironing them!) increases their value??? Hmm, how long before those fine folk at CGC and Wizard latch on to this one as another means to artificially inflate prices and convince the speculators how much their comics are worth...

Rolling Eyes

http://timebombcomics.blogspot.com/

http://www.comicspace.com/timebombcomics/

http://www.timebombcomics.com
KingZombie
Posted: Tuesday, July 07, 2009 1:07:53 PM

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That was a horrible video that accompanied the article. I couldn't really see what he was doing in it. I don't get it though, does it just fix spine rolls or does it fix creases too?
comicscastle
Posted: Tuesday, July 07, 2009 1:22:11 PM

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It fixes any form of creasing that doesn't break color, including spine stress. That's why a book that grades 9.4 (one or two small spine stress) can be turned into a 9.6 or higher. It can also take a FN or even a VG that has a lot of creases or a wave to the book and turn it into a VF or better. This has been going on for years, it's just now becoming common knowledge. By the way, if it isn't done correctly it can ruin the book, so if you decide to try it, experiment on cheap books first.



The following stores are all stores that I've dealt with or have become friends with through the forums and I highly recommend them all.
Comics Castle-owned & operated by Pat McCauslin
Alpha Comics--ComicVortex--Metropolis Connections 2.0--Comic Cellar


Nanosplicer
Posted: Tuesday, July 07, 2009 11:02:37 PM

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thomas4d4
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 1:54:10 AM

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I have been pressing my books for some time now.
when I get old books that have a rolled spine, I take out the iron, put it on the cool to medium setting, put a piece of copy paper between the iron and the comic (so that it doesn't dirty the comic) and iron. On real bad rolls, I sometimes need to iron the inner pages as well as the cover.

I don't think it improves the grade really, because a VG book has lots of color break that doesn't go away with ironing, you just have a nicer book.

Other improvements I like to make is, fix tears with archival tape, and re-color color breaks with makers. If the tear is really bad, and the ink might show through, I have learned to use a little paste on the spot first before I color. This creates a impermeable layer that prevents the ink from bleeding through.

But I do this just for myself (not to resell). Also, like I said, I don't think these methods can significantly raise the grade. If so maybe a half grade (from G to G+) because often the repairs can be seen (like in the case of the archival tape). The ironing can't be seen, but how many books have you seen with severe rolled spine and no creases or color breaks. Not very likely.

I like my books nice and readable books. I also like old books and often can't afford high grades so I get whatever grade I can afford and fix it up. The archival tape works great on covers that have fallen off or nearly fallen off. You take the staples out, put some tape on the torn parts, put the staples back, and suddenly you have a book that is as easy to open and read as any off the news stand.

The Great Comic Book Heroes
bovard
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 2:00:42 AM

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thomas4d4 wrote:
I have been pressing my books for some time now.
when I get old books that have a rolled spine, I take out the iron, put it on the cool to medium setting, put a piece of copy paper between the iron and the comic (so that it doesn't dirty the comic) and iron. On real bad rolls, I sometimes need to iron the inner pages as well as the cover.

I don't think it improves the grade really, because a VG book has lots of color break that doesn't go away with ironing, you just have a nicer book.

Other improvements I like to make is, fix tears with archival tape, and re-color color breaks with makers. If the tear is really bad, and the ink might show through, I have learned to use a little paste on the spot first before I color. This creates a impermeable layer that prevents the ink from bleeding through.

But I do this just for myself (not to resell). Also, like I said, I don't think these methods can significantly raise the grade. If so maybe a half grade (from G to G+) because often the repairs can be seen (like in the case of the archival tape). The ironing can't be seen, but how many books have you seen with severe rolled spine and no creases or color breaks. Not very likely.

I like my books nice and readable books. I also like old books and often can't afford high grades so I get whatever grade I can afford and fix it up. The archival tape works great on covers that have fallen off or nearly fallen off. You take the staples out, put some tape on the torn parts, put the staples back, and suddenly you have a book that is as easy to open and read as any off the news stand.


Have you ever used Japan paper and wheat paste/pva glue for paper repair, etc, instead of archival tape? It's what Antiquarian Book binders/restorers use.

Also, have to agree, comics with severe spine roll usually have a bunch of other problems that just don't "go away" with pressing.


thomas4d4
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 2:31:17 AM

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Wow, I have in the past but don't have access to any Japanese paper at the moment.
It's really great stuff. It's SUPER strong. It's super thin, and if you tear the edge a little you can almost make it invisible. Really great stuff.
The paste is easy and fun to make. You mix a little flour and water, then you heat it in a pot. The flour actually expands! A book binder friend would add a little book binding glue to this to make it stronger. But if you don't have any it's fine without.
I wouldn't use Elmers glue. It becomes brittle when it drys.

The Great Comic Book Heroes
bovard
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 2:42:00 AM

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thomas4d4 wrote:
Wow, I have in the past but don't have access to any Japanese paper at the moment.
It's really great stuff. It's SUPER strong. It's super thin, and if you tear the edge a little you can almost make it invisible. Really great stuff.
The paste is easy and fun to make. You mix a little flour and water, then you heat it in a pot. The flour actually expands! A book binder friend would add a little book binding glue to this to make it stronger. But if you don't have any it's fine without.
I wouldn't use Elmers glue. It becomes brittle when it drys.


NO Elmers, ever. I think the bookbinding glue is called PVA glue, although there are probably more than just one type. I get wheat paste, glue, and Japan paper, here at the University book/art store. Primarily we repair/rebind Antiquarian books, and sometimes I do Designiner Bindings, and on occassion have restored some comics from the Poor/Fair condition to possily GD/GD+, but this is usually just structural repair, and fairly obvious. But, I prefer a comic that does not fall apart when picked up and read, lol. Happy


thomas4d4
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 2:48:40 AM

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bovard wrote:
thomas4d4 wrote:
Wow, I have in the past but don't have access to any Japanese paper at the moment.
It's really great stuff. It's SUPER strong. It's super thin, and if you tear the edge a little you can almost make it invisible. Really great stuff.
The paste is easy and fun to make. You mix a little flour and water, then you heat it in a pot. The flour actually expands! A book binder friend would add a little book binding glue to this to make it stronger. But if you don't have any it's fine without.
I wouldn't use Elmers glue. It becomes brittle when it drys.


NO Elmers, ever. I think the bookbinding glue is called PVA glue, although there are probably more than just one type. I get wheat paste, glue, and Japan paper, here at the University book/art store. Primarily we repair/rebind Antiquarian books, and sometimes I do Designiner Bindings, and on occassion have restored some comics from the Poor/Fair condition to possily GD/GD+, but this is usually just structural repair, and fairly obvious. But, I prefer a comic that does not fall apart when picked up and read, lol. Happy


Wow so you do bindings! Can you see the Japanese paper repairs?

Have you ever tried to mist a comic and put it in a press? I wonder how that would work?

Also do you have any thoughts about re-coloring color breaks? What kind of ink to use?

The Great Comic Book Heroes
bovard
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 12:39:45 PM

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thomas4d4 wrote:
bovard wrote:
thomas4d4 wrote:
Wow, I have in the past but don't have access to any Japanese paper at the moment.
It's really great stuff. It's SUPER strong. It's super thin, and if you tear the edge a little you can almost make it invisible. Really great stuff.
The paste is easy and fun to make. You mix a little flour and water, then you heat it in a pot. The flour actually expands! A book binder friend would add a little book binding glue to this to make it stronger. But if you don't have any it's fine without.
I wouldn't use Elmers glue. It becomes brittle when it drys.


NO Elmers, ever. I think the bookbinding glue is called PVA glue, although there are probably more than just one type. I get wheat paste, glue, and Japan paper, here at the University book/art store. Primarily we repair/rebind Antiquarian books, and sometimes I do Designiner Bindings, and on occassion have restored some comics from the Poor/Fair condition to possily GD/GD+, but this is usually just structural repair, and fairly obvious. But, I prefer a comic that does not fall apart when picked up and read, lol. Happy


Wow so you do bindings! Can you see the Japanese paper repairs?

Have you ever tried to mist a comic and put it in a press? I wonder how that would work?

Also do you have any thoughts about re-coloring color breaks? What kind of ink to use?


With Japan paper you can usually get it in different weights, and different colors - well different tones of white or tan, so matching it to the existing paper color would be the place to start. If you have an old comic with heavy tanning/browning to the paper, you want to try and match that color as best as possible. When picking out the paper look for any grain pattern, try to match that to the existing paper as well. (Japan paper has no traditional "grain Direction" but you still see some grain to it). Tearing the edges, as you mentioned, is the best way to blend it in. It won't be totally invisible, but should blend really well.

You know, I've thought about putting some comics with either a roll or waviness into a bookbinding press, to try and flatten them, but have never done it. I would be leary to add moisture to any comic, maybe steam?

I'm not really sure what kind of color the professional use. I've talked to Susan Cicconi of The Restoration Lab, and we never got into what she actually uses. Here in the Bookbinding Studio we are using Acrylic Ink, that we get at the University art store, and is mainly for color touch on the boards, corners, etc. We have used it to dye the page edges a solid color on some occassions, and sometimes on the leather itself.


bovard
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 12:54:14 PM

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Just thought I would show you an example of my work. It's what's called a Designer Binding, and is done completely with leather. It is a full leather binding, and the tecnique is called Inlay and Only. I draw the design myself, so it's my own creation, not a copy of a picture or specific scene or anything, just my imagination of the Southwestern desert.



The book is shown upright with both the front and back boards fully open, the spine is right in the middle of the picture.


punisherfan1138
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 2:51:00 PM
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bovard wrote:
Just thought I would show you an example of my work. It's what's called a Designer Binding, and is done completely with leather. It is a full leather binding, and the tecnique is called Inlay and Only. I draw the design myself, so it's my own creation, not a copy of a picture or specific scene or anything, just my imagination of the Southwestern desert.



The book is shown upright with both the front and back boards fully open, the spine is right in the middle of the picture.


I'll remember this if I ever want to bind my books.Applause
thomas4d4
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 5:29:06 PM

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Man Bovar, that book is beautiful!

Personally I love the old style bindings where the cover is glued to the spine and the bands show through.

Have you ever bound comics? I have a few cloth bindings I did of things like Crisis and Swamp Thing.

The Great Comic Book Heroes
Sirs
Posted: Wednesday, July 08, 2009 6:56:14 PM

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Bovar I sent you a pm

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If you can help with anything please check this out

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bovard
Posted: Thursday, July 09, 2009 12:14:14 AM

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thomas4d4 wrote:
Man Bovar, that book is beautiful!

Personally I love the old style bindings where the cover is glued to the spine and the bands show through.

Have you ever bound comics? I have a few cloth bindings I did of things like Crisis and Swamp Thing.


Those old books are really what we do the most. Restoration or rebinding. we try and make them how they would have originally been bound. Usually the book we work on are literally falling apart. So it's either rebind them, or they will be lost forever.

The only comics I've done was a Watchmen trade edition. It started out a softcover, and I made boards for it, then bound in full leather. Should we start up a new thread for bookbinding, and binding comics? (I know there was one a while ago, but think it's long gone)



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