Log In Forums Help
Comic Collector Live
Home :: CCL Messageboard
Find Comics for Sale
Items For Sale
All Comics For Sale
New Releases
CGC Comics
Bundled Lots
Store Locator
Search Library
Search By Title
Publisher
Story Arc
Character
Credits
Release Date
Change Request Manager
News & Reviews
Reviews
News
Our Products and Services
Get the Software
Buying Comics And Stuff
Selling Your Comics
Opening A Store
Community
Forum
Store Locator
Member Locator
Welcome Guest Active Topics
The "Why Is This Issue Worth So Much?" Thread Options
outcast
Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2012 8:15:30 AM
Rank: Large Noggin
Groups: Member, Newsstand Edition Host

Joined: 7/28/2012
Posts: 414
Points: 1,828
BurningDoom wrote:
Nobody cares about Miller anymore? I've never been a big Frank Miller fan before, but the influence in the Nolan Batman films and the success of Sin City and 300 seems to suggest otherwise.
Personally, when I watched "The Dark Knight Rises," I saw much more taken from the work of Denny O'Neil than from the work of Frank Miller. From O'Neil as a writer, TDKR took (from "There is No Hope in Crime Alley," Detective Comics 457, March 1976) the transformational moment of kindness to the young Bruce Wayne in the moments following the killing of his parents (even if Nolan chose to give the moment to Gordon, rather than to Leslie Thompkins), and (from the early '70s series of stories that introduced Ra's Al Ghul) the character of, and Batman's relationship with, Talia. From O'Neil as an editor, TKDR took (from the Knightfall series generally) the character of Bane, (from Batman 497, July 1993 specifically) the image of Bane injuring Batman by dropping him onto his raised knee, and (from the No Man's Land series generally, in most Bat-comics published in 1999) the concept of a city isolated from the nation with enforcement by the federal government.

Really, of all the people who worked on Batman in the comics, I think The Dark Knight Rises owes more to O'Neil than to any other individual (with the possible of exception of Batman's creators, Bob Kane and Bill Finger).
comicuniversity
Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2012 9:44:57 AM
Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Member, Moderator

Joined: 4/18/2012
Posts: 1,219
Points: 4,432
outcast wrote:
BurningDoom wrote:
Nobody cares about Miller anymore? I've never been a big Frank Miller fan before, but the influence in the Nolan Batman films and the success of Sin City and 300 seems to suggest otherwise.
Personally, when I watched "The Dark Knight Rises," I saw much more taken from the work of Denny O'Neil than from the work of Frank Miller. From O'Neil as a writer, TDKR took (from "There is No Hope in Crime Alley," Detective Comics 457, March 1976) the transformational moment of kindness to the young Bruce Wayne in the moments following the killing of his parents (even if Nolan chose to give the moment to Gordon, rather than to Leslie Thompkins), and (from the early '70s series of stories that introduced Ra's Al Ghul) the character of, and Batman's relationship with, Talia. From O'Neil as an editor, TKDR took (from the Knightfall series generally) the character of Bane, (from Batman 497, July 1993 specifically) the image of Bane injuring Batman by dropping him onto his raised knee, and (from the No Man's Land series generally, in most Bat-comics published in 1999) the concept of a city isolated from the nation with enforcement by the federal government.

Really, of all the people who worked on Batman in the comics, I think The Dark Knight Rises owes more to O'Neil than to any other individual (with the possible of exception of Batman's creators, Bob Kane and Bill Finger).


Excellent observation!! I have always believed that Denny O'neil is a HIGHLY underrated talent and influence on the entire history of Batman.
LordMikel
Posted: Saturday, October 27, 2012 6:50:33 PM
Rank: Metahuman
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2007
Posts: 151
Points: 453
I think it is Overstreet hates to lower prices. And sometimes there is a perception of demand, but little supply.
Dementia5
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:12:37 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Beta, Guru, Member, Moderator, Subscriber

Joined: 2/7/2007
Posts: 3,388
Points: 11,735
Location: Boston
outcast wrote:
BurningDoom wrote:
Nobody cares about Miller anymore? I've never been a big Frank Miller fan before, but the influence in the Nolan Batman films and the success of Sin City and 300 seems to suggest otherwise.
Personally, when I watched "The Dark Knight Rises," I saw much more taken from the work of Denny O'Neil than from the work of Frank Miller. From O'Neil as a writer, TDKR took (from "There is No Hope in Crime Alley," Detective Comics 457, March 1976) the transformational moment of kindness to the young Bruce Wayne in the moments following the killing of his parents (even if Nolan chose to give the moment to Gordon, rather than to Leslie Thompkins), and (from the early '70s series of stories that introduced Ra's Al Ghul) the character of, and Batman's relationship with, Talia. From O'Neil as an editor, TKDR took (from the Knightfall series generally) the character of Bane, (from Batman 497, July 1993 specifically) the image of Bane injuring Batman by dropping him onto his raised knee, and (from the No Man's Land series generally, in most Bat-comics published in 1999) the concept of a city isolated from the nation with enforcement by the federal government.

Really, of all the people who worked on Batman in the comics, I think The Dark Knight Rises owes more to O'Neil than to any other individual (with the possible of exception of Batman's creators, Bob Kane and Bill Finger).


Denny O'Neil may well be the most influential Batman talent of his decade, even over Neal Adams' introduction to the character in 1970 to whom I give a lot of credit. Up to that point, Batman (and most of DC really) finally got off of their 60s camp ledge (which I didn't find as distasteful as several members in this forum, probably my love for the show as a kid growing up in the 70s)... and finally began to catch up with Marvel's level of grit and dark storytelling. This "mature" level of reading would finally pay off in the mid 80s, as DC was finally regarded as an adult read, with a lot of kudos had by Alan Moore and Frank Miller with their obvious iconic titles, and toward the entire Vertigo line of comics. For their efforts, they exceeded Marvel's monthly sales, a feat that had not been achieved since the 50s.

But I never understood why Frank Miller never retained his regal position for very long, as I see him and his works often dismissed here, as the evidence continues to roll out with this thread.

I find it baffling... but for my money, he did for Batman what no-one had done since the stalwarts of O'Neil, Adams, Rogers, Englehart and, yes I can now say, Goodwin did 10 - 15 years prior. Same to be said for Howard Chaykin and Steve Gerber for their work; where is the love?

"We make a pretty good team, even if we don't work together." - My son





We put the "RP" into RPG!

www.neverdarklands.net

...Dementia 5 Blog...



Make sure that you READ and UNDERSTAND the forum rules HERE

outcast
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 9:19:51 AM
Rank: Large Noggin
Groups: Member, Newsstand Edition Host

Joined: 7/28/2012
Posts: 414
Points: 1,828
Dementia5 wrote:
Denny O'Neil may well be the most influential Batman talent of his decade, even over Neal Adams' introduction to the character in 1970 to whom I give a lot of credit. Up to that point, Batman (and most of DC really) finally got off of their 60s camp ledge (which I didn't find as distasteful as several members in this forum, probably my love for the show as a kid growing up in the 70s)... and finally began to catch up with Marvel's level of grit and dark storytelling. This "mature" level of reading would finally pay off in the mid 80s, as DC was finally regarded as an adult read, with a lot of kudos had by Alan Moore and Frank Miller with their obvious iconic titles, and toward the entire Vertigo line of comics. For their efforts, they exceeded Marvel's monthly sales, a feat that had not been achieved since the 50s.

But I never understood why Frank Miller never retained his regal position for very long, as I see him and his works often dismissed here, as the evidence continues to roll out with this thread.

I find it baffling... but for my money, he did for Batman what no-one had done since the stalwarts of O'Neil, Adams, Rogers, Englehart and, yes I can now say, Goodwin did 10 - 15 years prior. Same to be said for Howard Chaykin and Steve Gerber for their work; where is the love?
It wasn't my intent to dismiss the remarkable achievements of Frank Miller with the Batman character, and with other comics (though I regret to say that Miller's greatest achievements may be well in his past at this point). My point was that, where The Dark Knight Rises draws directly from the comics, it seems to draw predominately from O'Neil comics.

BTW, D5, I note with pleasure your re-evaluation, at least with regard to Batman stories, of the work of Archie Goodwin. How did you like the Manhunter series?
Dementia5
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 9:28:13 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Beta, Guru, Member, Moderator, Subscriber

Joined: 2/7/2007
Posts: 3,388
Points: 11,735
Location: Boston
outcast wrote:
Dementia5 wrote:
Denny O'Neil may well be the most influential Batman talent of his decade, even over Neal Adams' introduction to the character in 1970 to whom I give a lot of credit. Up to that point, Batman (and most of DC really) finally got off of their 60s camp ledge (which I didn't find as distasteful as several members in this forum, probably my love for the show as a kid growing up in the 70s)... and finally began to catch up with Marvel's level of grit and dark storytelling. This "mature" level of reading would finally pay off in the mid 80s, as DC was finally regarded as an adult read, with a lot of kudos had by Alan Moore and Frank Miller with their obvious iconic titles, and toward the entire Vertigo line of comics. For their efforts, they exceeded Marvel's monthly sales, a feat that had not been achieved since the 50s.

But I never understood why Frank Miller never retained his regal position for very long, as I see him and his works often dismissed here, as the evidence continues to roll out with this thread.

I find it baffling... but for my money, he did for Batman what no-one had done since the stalwarts of O'Neil, Adams, Rogers, Englehart and, yes I can now say, Goodwin did 10 - 15 years prior. Same to be said for Howard Chaykin and Steve Gerber for their work; where is the love?
It wasn't my intent to dismiss the remarkable achievements of Frank Miller with the Batman character, and with other comics (though I regret to say that Miller's greatest achievements may be well in his past at this point). My point was that, where The Dark Knight Rises draws directly from the comics, it seems to draw predominately from O'Neil comics.

BTW, D5, I note with pleasure your re-evaluation, at least with regard to Batman stories, of the work of Archie Goodwin. How did you like the Manhunter series?


Oh, I know you weren't talking smack about Miller. In fact, I was directing my observations on several posts that I witnessed or outright participated in threads long gone by. Although I agree, Miller's best work may well be behind him, while I still believe Moore still has plenty of gas in the tank.

The Goodwin stories were a catalyst to this, actually:

http://www.comiccollectorlive.com/forum/default.aspx?g=posts&m=581852#581852

Yes, the Goodwin stories are great, but I've only read the first two so far of the six (hey, 100 pages is a LOT of material and yes, I am that guy who reads the backup stories that herald an era long past) with one Manhunter story which I enjoyed. But the core Batman tales are on par with Englehart, so that's as good a plug as I can muster on a Sunday morning right now.

In fact I encourage you to check the link, you may be able to help.


"We make a pretty good team, even if we don't work together." - My son





We put the "RP" into RPG!

www.neverdarklands.net

...Dementia 5 Blog...



Make sure that you READ and UNDERSTAND the forum rules HERE

Thundercron
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 9:32:47 AM

Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Member, Super Seller

Shop at My Store

Joined: 9/14/2008
Posts: 2,262
Points: 30,186
Location: Vancouver, Washington
Dementia5 wrote:
outcast wrote:
BurningDoom wrote:
Nobody cares about Miller anymore? I've never been a big Frank Miller fan before, but the influence in the Nolan Batman films and the success of Sin City and 300 seems to suggest otherwise.
Personally, when I watched "The Dark Knight Rises," I saw much more taken from the work of Denny O'Neil than from the work of Frank Miller. From O'Neil as a writer, TDKR took (from "There is No Hope in Crime Alley," Detective Comics 457, March 1976) the transformational moment of kindness to the young Bruce Wayne in the moments following the killing of his parents (even if Nolan chose to give the moment to Gordon, rather than to Leslie Thompkins), and (from the early '70s series of stories that introduced Ra's Al Ghul) the character of, and Batman's relationship with, Talia. From O'Neil as an editor, TKDR took (from the Knightfall series generally) the character of Bane, (from Batman 497, July 1993 specifically) the image of Bane injuring Batman by dropping him onto his raised knee, and (from the No Man's Land series generally, in most Bat-comics published in 1999) the concept of a city isolated from the nation with enforcement by the federal government.

Really, of all the people who worked on Batman in the comics, I think The Dark Knight Rises owes more to O'Neil than to any other individual (with the possible of exception of Batman's creators, Bob Kane and Bill Finger).


Denny O'Neil may well be the most influential Batman talent of his decade, even over Neal Adams' introduction to the character in 1970 to whom I give a lot of credit. Up to that point, Batman (and most of DC really) finally got off of their 60s camp ledge (which I didn't find as distasteful as several members in this forum, probably my love for the show as a kid growing up in the 70s)... and finally began to catch up with Marvel's level of grit and dark storytelling. This "mature" level of reading would finally pay off in the mid 80s, as DC was finally regarded as an adult read, with a lot of kudos had by Alan Moore and Frank Miller with their obvious iconic titles, and toward the entire Vertigo line of comics. For their efforts, they exceeded Marvel's monthly sales, a feat that had not been achieved since the 50s.

But I never understood why Frank Miller never retained his regal position for very long, as I see him and his works often dismissed here, as the evidence continues to roll out with this thread.

I find it baffling... but for my money, he did for Batman what no-one had done since the stalwarts of O'Neil, Adams, Rogers, Englehart and, yes I can now say, Goodwin did 10 - 15 years prior. Same to be said for Howard Chaykin and Steve Gerber for their work; where is the love?


This is what I don't understand. It's usually normal for a creator to reach a zenith at some point in his career, and then it's downhill from there. Look at Jack Kirby--nobody really talks too much about his late-70's work, and his work at Pacific (where you would expect his best work to come from, since he was freed from all editorial constraints while he was there) was greeted with a giant industry-wide yawn. But he's still called "The King of Comics", and everybody still talks about his 50's and 60's classic works.

I wish the same were true for Frank Miller, but instead the disdain for him has caused people to retroactively dismiss his past works (as you pointed out). And it's not just in these forums on CCL. Just go on YouTube and watch some vids featuring Miller, and just read all the hate comments people leave for no good reason.
Dementia5
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 10:12:18 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Beta, Guru, Member, Moderator, Subscriber

Joined: 2/7/2007
Posts: 3,388
Points: 11,735
Location: Boston
...and we haven't even addressed his absolute brilliance with Daredevil. Often overlooked, Elektra was probably Marvel's most believable and engaging female power star. The fact that her introduction and immersion with the DD storyline just so happened to be augmented by first rate scripting and plot makes these stories all the more wonderful.

I also love his artwork, but clearly he brings something to the table something that few writers beforehand could only dream of. Ask yourself how would comic books be today without Miller's gritty storytelling backing up the grime and realism of today's modern comics? Answer: it would be more like Chaykin and Wagner with Moore leading the pack. Not a bad turn, but there would be a gaping hole.

Has anyone noticed how John Romita jr has taken the same approach in his breakdowns and pencils to emulate those of Miller over the years? At least Miller's deeds have not gone unnoticed by him.

"We make a pretty good team, even if we don't work together." - My son





We put the "RP" into RPG!

www.neverdarklands.net

...Dementia 5 Blog...



Make sure that you READ and UNDERSTAND the forum rules HERE

ukblueky
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 10:14:55 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/7/2007
Posts: 4,124
Points: 12,372
Location: Kentucky
I dont personally hate Miller but I think he is overrated or in at least regards to his Batman stuff.I hated Dark Knight Returns.Hated All Star Batman and Robin.So to me all hes got is Year One.

SuperSoldier124
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 10:18:20 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/3/2007
Posts: 2,937
Points: 8,872
Location: Falcon, Colorado
he was good in the 80's. now he cant even finish a stinkin book! lookin at you all star batman!

add me on xbox live and PSN

PS3: wartorn11b
360: precious blood1

frozilla
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 11:53:30 AM

Rank: Large Noggin
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 355
Points: 1,078
To answer the question about the DD run being overvalued, I think that it's considered one of the quintessential runs to collect, hence it keeping it's value. It's akin to saying an artist isn't as popular these days (Neal Adams?) - why are all his old art runs highly valued? I think they're still sought after by collectors, which makes 'em keep their value :)




Big signatures are REALLY annoying.
junkmonkey
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 10:53:41 PM

Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Media Host, Member, Moderator

Joined: 5/10/2007
Posts: 1,885
Points: 6,422
I've got one. Uncanny X-Force #4



There is not one on here, and eBay's lowest is about $35. Heck even the next ten issues or so seem overpriced. I know what happens in the issue, but I would have thought the shock of it would wear off by now and it would at least go down a little bit.

roguesquad
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 6:46:10 AM

Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/2/2007
Posts: 1,091
Points: 3,273
Location: Maine
How about this?




I realize the cover price was $5.99.. but that was 13 years ago. Don't these things usually go down in value? There are 3 on CCL ranging from $9.50 to $15.00.

All That I Need Are Things I Don't Need.
SuperSoldier124
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 8:32:12 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/3/2007
Posts: 2,937
Points: 8,872
Location: Falcon, Colorado
junkmonkey wrote:
I've got one. Uncanny X-Force #4



There is not one on here, and eBay's lowest is about $35. Heck even the next ten issues or so seem overpriced. I know what happens in the issue, but I would have thought the shock of it would wear off by now and it would at least go down a little bit.
i was wondering this the other day my self. issue 2 is more than the first issue. i dont get it.

add me on xbox live and PSN

PS3: wartorn11b
360: precious blood1

Dementia5
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 9:13:07 AM

Rank: Celestial
Groups: Beta, Guru, Member, Moderator, Subscriber

Joined: 2/7/2007
Posts: 3,388
Points: 11,735
Location: Boston
ukblueky wrote:
I dont personally hate Miller but I think he is overrated or in at least regards to his Batman stuff.I hated Dark Knight Returns.Hated All Star Batman and Robin.So to me all hes got is Year One.


I have found that folks who read TDKR when it hit the shelf consider it the holy grail of comics, at least up to that point... I am one of the charting members of this fan club.

But I have also discovered that those who read this work later in life don't find as much value in its release, to the point of scratching their heads in disbelief. I'm guessing readers either missed all the hype that surrounded it (CNN, USA Today, Stephen King on interview, etc... at a time when mass opinion of comic books was rarely, if ever, brought to mainstream media), or have become jaded by (or "used to") the trend of modern comics that have enjoyed its influence as it's gritty approach spilled (and continues to spill) into the popular norm.


frozilla wrote:
To answer the question about the DD run being overvalued, I think that it's considered one of the quintessential runs to collect, hence it keeping it's value. It's akin to saying an artist isn't as popular these days (Neal Adams?) - why are all his old art runs highly valued? I think they're still sought after by collectors, which makes 'em keep their value :)




What some folks don't realize is that Neal Adams has been busy adapting much of Marvel's work into motion comics. That is a million dollar enterprise, and takes a LOT of hard work, and I'll go so far as to say without Adams and his school running the operation, you would see a lot less of Iron Man, Spider Woman and X-Men on the small screen, under this very enjoyable format.

"We make a pretty good team, even if we don't work together." - My son





We put the "RP" into RPG!

www.neverdarklands.net

...Dementia 5 Blog...



Make sure that you READ and UNDERSTAND the forum rules HERE

wadinom
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 9:36:40 AM

Rank: Vigilante
Groups: Member, Super Seller

Shop at My Store

Joined: 7/3/2010
Posts: 93
Points: 279
being a huge adam warlock fan that annual is a key book in his storyline as he was dead for quite a while afterwards so it being his death issue became worth some money plus it is small print run and hard to find.
frozilla
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 11:09:04 AM

Rank: Large Noggin
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 355
Points: 1,078
I'm not certain of the rationale for Uncanny X-Force #4 other than it was the end of the Apocalypse Solution? I think it might've been early in the run where ppl hadn't caught onto it yet? Just throwing stuff out there.

Wolverine/Cable book..no idea? Maybe it's the only one these vendors have and they haven't seen another around? I couldn't pinpoint why that's priced that way.

I didn't know that about Neal Adams. Being that not many know that, would that play a role in his work being valued as high as it is? I was comparing his and Miller's work, to why it was priced the way it was.

Big signatures are REALLY annoying.
Thundercron
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 11:46:43 AM

Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Member, Super Seller

Shop at My Store

Joined: 9/14/2008
Posts: 2,262
Points: 30,186
Location: Vancouver, Washington
roguesquad wrote:
How about this?




I realize the cover price was $5.99.. but that was 13 years ago. Don't these things usually go down in value? There are 3 on CCL ranging from $9.50 to $15.00.


This one came out in 1999, after the comics market had burst. Most comic fans had left the building, and this one carried a hefty cover price, further ensuring nobody would buy it. It also featuring a rare Marvel appearance by artist Stephen Platt.

Nowadays, Cable fans want it, Wolverine fans want it, and Stephen Platt fans want it. Not enough copies to go around.
Thundercron
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 11:57:53 AM

Rank: Herald of Galactus
Groups: Member, Super Seller

Shop at My Store

Joined: 9/14/2008
Posts: 2,262
Points: 30,186
Location: Vancouver, Washington
Dementia5 wrote:
ukblueky wrote:
I dont personally hate Miller but I think he is overrated or in at least regards to his Batman stuff.I hated Dark Knight Returns.Hated All Star Batman and Robin.So to me all hes got is Year One.


I have found that folks who read TDKR when it hit the shelf consider it the holy grail of comics, at least up to that point... I am one of the charting members of this fan club.

But I have also discovered that those who read this work later in life don't find as much value in its release, to the point of scratching their heads in disbelief. I'm guessing readers either missed all the hype that surrounded it (CNN, USA Today, Stephen King on interview, etc... at a time when mass opinion of comic books was rarely, if ever, brought to mainstream media), or have become jaded by (or "used to") the trend of modern comics that have enjoyed its influence as it's gritty approach spilled (and continues to spill) into the popular norm.



This is 100% correct. Back in 2000 I took a road trip from here in Washington state to Indiana. I decided to buy all the seminal comics works I had been hearing about over the previous ten or fifteen years and read them on the trip--y'know, Dark Knight Returns, Killing Joke, Watchmen, etc. I pretty much reacted to most of it with a "well, I guess that was okay...". But I can read Miller's Born Again over and over again and still be blown away by it. The difference in reactions is because I was pretty much on board with Botn Again shortly after it came out. I read it when it was new and fresh. Waiting fifteen years to read the other works meant that everything I had read since then in other comics were influenced by those works (hence their high regard as comics), so it just seemed like more of the same (just a little bit better).

It's like watching Citizen Cain. This movie came out in like 1940, and everyone agrees that it was such an innovative film at the time that every movie made since then lends credit to this film, because Citizen Cane pioneered so many movie making techniques that are in use today. But that's the caveat--when every movie you've ever seen lends credit to Citizen Cane, then watching Citizen Cane means it's just another movie using ideas you've seen before. In fact, Citizen Cane seems a little inferior, because Hollywood has had the past 70 years to perfect these techniques.
frozilla
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 12:12:02 PM

Rank: Large Noggin
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 355
Points: 1,078
Thundercron wrote:

This one came out in 1999, after the comics market had burst. Most comic fans had left the building, and this one carried a hefty cover price, further ensuring nobody would buy it. It also featuring a rare Marvel appearance by artist Stephen Platt.

Nowadays, Cable fans want it, Wolverine fans want it, and Stephen Platt fans want it. Not enough copies to go around.


That's a really good explanation! Though Platt has confused me...his body of work is really small isn't it? Why is he in that group of artists?

Big signatures are REALLY annoying.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

This page was generated in 0.292 seconds.

ADVERTISEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
All images on comic collector live copyright of their respective publishers. © Copyright 2008, MidTen Media Inc. GOLO241