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Where do unsold Newstand Editions go? Options
monidaw1
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 3:04:30 AM

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The way the poll is worded I'd have to vote no. I don't think they're "Variants" and as such that's going to scew the results kinda like they say on that millionaire game not to tell the audience what you're thinking before using the poll lifeline. Rain

Is there enough visual difference to seperate them, for many the answer should be yes. Going a step further with there being an actual visual difference in the book, that makes them more of a variant from each other than seperating them based on whatever they're packaged with that's not even part of the comic or cover like those X-Force #1s. All we'd be doing is using the database to distinguish one book from another, not claiming it as a variant. These books actually had seperate printing, distribution and visual end results. X-Force #1, just a different card dropped in the bag randomly.

Are Newsstand editions more valuable meaning they shouldn't be lumped in bulk with the rest? For many the answer appears to be yes.

Are there verifiable reasons to show why the limited quantities occur making the Newsstands rarer and worth more? In many cases yes

As retailers do we provide the services our customers request? If possible then yes

As a database should we offer a way to make sure the information about the issues is accurate and referenceable? If not here then where? Know another database we could try or DIY?

Would having a few going in slowly/calmly now make the implementation of the barcode scanner stuff a smoother transition in six months or so when they put out the new system? I'd think so as oppossed to getting swamped all at once at a time of confusion with other problems to deal with.

Is there a secret warehouse full of VGish Newsstands yet to be discovered? Keep the dream alive. Big Grin

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monidaw1
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 7:51:12 AM

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New question, same general topic so I figure I'd ask here instead of in a new thread.



X-men 33

I understand that based on existing guidelines that there has to be something different other than the bar code having different numbers and the words "DIRECT EDITION" for a Newsstand to be considered for inclusion.

In this case would the UK price of $1.25 pounds be enough?

Also, what's the two C's inside the bigger Pacman looking C mean?

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outcast
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 8:12:44 AM
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The triple-C emblem is a logo of Curtis Circulation Company, the newsstand distributor of most Marvel comics from the late 1960s until the mid-2000s. Generally, it's not seen on direct-sales Marvels (but there are plenty of exceptions).

Also, remember the Doctor Strange Sorcerer Supreme #2 example I cited? (It's the issue that seems not to exist with what we would regard as direct-sales marking, even though it was sold in direct-sales comics shops.) It, and several other Marvels published ca. 1989–92 do NOT have the triple-C emblem on what otherwise appear to be newsstand versions. This leads me to speculate that, for those few years, Marvel had newsstand distribution deals with TWO different distributors, and that the two distributors each had a distinct group of Marvel titles that they distributed. The newer distributor (the one that wasn't Curtis) seems not to have insisted on the distinctive markings for direct-sales and newsstand versions. All of the comics that I know of in the 1989–92 period that seem not to exist in differentiated direct-sales versions, also do not have the triple-C emblem.

I'm not qualified to answer regarding CCL's policy on the UK price difference.
monidaw1
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 11:24:20 AM

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Thank you.

I found a bunch of Avengers West Coast issues witht the same general look but on those the UK price was included on the Direct issues centered under the month so I didn't scan those, just went ahead and identified them on my own with notes in the market notes and distinct pricing ending in 7 so they're easy to tell like the others in other titles as I find them.

It's kinda funny how some titles are filled with lots of Newstand Editions while other's they're like a needle in a haystack to find one. X-men Classic had bunches, X-Force Annual #1 only had one out of all those Annual #1's. I'm starting to think the destroy the unsold books or at least cover thing didn't start until later years. Two titles down, 8,000 or so more to check. Whew!

Now that I'm actively watching for them I'm seeing them frequently. Found a couple Tales of the Thing Newsstands and sent them up the path this morning since there was a price difference and 3's already in the database. Once they're approved I could do a whole Newsstand Lot. Big Grin

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monidaw1
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 3:45:37 PM

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New thoughts.

I just finished going through a stack of Classic X-men. It's looking like almost 80% of the early issues are Newsstand. Raised Eyebrow

Trying to make sense of this lets see if I understand the history. When they started printing seperate Direct and Newsstand editions most books were going out through the Newsstand distribution route/ spinrack at the 7-11 kinda thing. Therefore Direct editions should be the rare ones from the early 80's. At some point they kicked the majority of that distribution to the curb and Direct distribution passed Newstand in quantity and hasn't looked back since.

Any idea when the changeover was? My guess is I could almost find the exact month by just following one of the titles in print from before till after and just counting the quantities of each type of book. Nerd

I missed it because I was in the Army in Germany from 87 to 90 with all my books coming from AAFES shelf at the PX/bookstore on post so they could have been from either source. When I got back to Bragg in 90 I was shopping at a comic shop just off post so those should have been Direct, then when I got back from Desert Storm I took one look at X-men #1 with all those covers and sold off the collection I'd started and stayed away until last year.

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AvidGamer
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 5:14:38 PM

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outcast wrote:
AvidGamer wrote:
I was in a discount book store a month or two back and found that some company packages newsstand comic books back issues in bundles of 4. I bought a few and the assortment was totally random. I did get a New 52 Flash #1 in there which was a nice surprise.
That certainly sounds like an operation supplied by newsstand comics snagged after retail display. I stand corrected!

I would love to see more details about this; e.g., name of city, name of discount bookstore, price of 4-pack, condition of bundled comics, etc.


I don't remember the name of e discount book store but it was in Woodbridge, Va and the comics were in nm-condition. In fact 5 Below had a similar assortment packaged together for $3.99 a few weeks back as well.

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outcast
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 5:55:05 PM
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monidaw1 wrote:
New thoughts.

I just finished going through a stack of Classic X-men. It's looking like almost 80% of the early issues are Newsstand. Raised Eyebrow

Trying to make sense of this lets see if I understand the history. When they started printing seperate Direct and Newsstand editions most books were going out through the Newsstand distribution route/ spinrack at the 7-11 kinda thing. Therefore Direct editions should be the rare ones from the early 80's. At some point they kicked the majority of that distribution to the curb and Direct distribution passed Newstand in quantity and hasn't looked back since.

Any idea when the changeover was? My guess is I could almost find the exact month by just following one of the titles in print from before till after and just counting the quantities of each type of book. Nerd

I missed it because I was in the Army in Germany from 87 to 90 with all my books coming from AAFES shelf at the PX/bookstore on post so they could have been from either source. When I got back to Bragg in 90 I was shopping at a comic shop just off post so those should have been Direct, then when I got back from Desert Storm I took one look at X-men #1 with all those covers and sold off the collection I'd started and stayed away until last year.
I think some titles that sold well on newsstands didn't sell as well in comics shops (e.g., Archie). And it's obvious that many titles sold successfully in comics shops with no newsstand presence whatsoever. So what conclusions can we draw about sales across the industry? I don't know. I would speculate that collectors tended to move to comics shops (hence direct-sales copies) more quickly than casual readers did. I would speculate that collectors were more likely to preserve their comics in nice condition than casual readers were. Based on comments by other users here, there appears to be no shortage of newsstand comics published through most of the 1980s; on the other hand, I haven't seen anyone testify that newsstand comics from the 1980s are preserved in high grade in quantities comparable to preserved high-grade direct-sales comics. In my own experience shopping for comics locally, finding FR/G/VG newsstand comics from the 1980s isn't too hard, even finding the odd VF/NM newsstand comic from the 1980s hasn't been unusual, but finding particular issues in VF/NM newsstand continues to be quite challenging.

During the 1990s, we had the comics bubble (through 1992) and the bursting of the bubble (ca. 1993, I think). I would speculate that newsstand comics sales suffered during and after '93, just as comic shop sales did. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that the across-the-board decline in newsstand outlets began about this time (but I'm speculating again).

I do know that, locally, the only current outlets for newsstand comics seem to be national bookstore chains and national toy store chains. But really, I didn't pay much attention to newsstand comics for more than 25 years. So, while I can make guesses, and while I can tell you what I see locally (in terms of both back issues and new comics), there's a lot that I just don't know.
outcast
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 5:59:57 PM
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AvidGamer wrote:
I don't remember the name of e discount book store but it was in Woodbridge, Va and the comics were in nm-condition. In fact 5 Below had a similar assortment packaged together for $3.99 a few weeks back as well.
Thank you for the additional details.

I'm not familiar with "5 Below"; what is it?
AvidGamer
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 6:07:11 PM

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outcast wrote:
AvidGamer wrote:
I don't remember the name of e discount book store but it was in Woodbridge, Va and the comics were in nm-condition. In fact 5 Below had a similar assortment packaged together for $3.99 a few weeks back as well.
Thank you for the additional details.

I'm not familiar with "5 Below"; what is it?


Five Below (actual spelling) is a discount store chain. They sell all sorts of stuff at, you guess it...$5 or below. It is a more "upscale" dollar store.

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outcast
Posted: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 6:30:51 PM
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AvidGamer wrote:
Five Below (actual spelling) is a discount store chain. They sell all sorts of stuff at, you guess it...$5 or below. It is a more "upscale" dollar store.
No wonder I didn't find a CCL store by that name!

Thanks again.
monidaw1
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 7:23:04 AM

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As a kid growing up there was a 7-11, a local gas station/convienience store and a drug store selling comics, I presume Newsstand editions. That was just in my one small country town with similar distribution through all the towns in the area.

From the 90's to now I don't know of anywhere between Richmond and Lynchburg selling comics. That's a rather huge area. Humongous even. I wasn't even sure they were still being produced and I still can't wrap my head around how they could possibly be selling more now with such limited distribution as they did back then with a spin rack everywhere you shopped. Entire generations of children are now growing up never even seeing a comic book or at least not seeing any that aren't old and tattered. If you don't have a family member wanting to take you into the big city to one of the few B&M's still in existence you'd never have exposure to them.

I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil



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outcast
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 9:24:37 AM
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monidaw1 wrote:
As a kid growing up there was a 7-11, a local gas station/convienience store and a drug store selling comics, I presume Newsstand editions. That was just in my one small country town with similar distribution through all the towns in the area.
Those were the days, huh?

monidaw1 wrote:
From the 90's to now I don't know of anywhere between Richmond and Lynchburg selling comics. That's a rather huge area. Humongous even. I wasn't even sure they were still being produced and I still can't wrap my head around how they could possibly be selling more now with such limited distribution as they did back then with a spin rack everywhere you shopped. Entire generations of children are now growing up never even seeing a comic book or at least not seeing any that aren't old and tattered. If you don't have a family member wanting to take you into the big city to one of the few B&M's still in existence you'd never have exposure to them.
After the posts I wrote yesterday, I recalled a few isolated events pertaining to newsstand comics between 1982 and 2012.

In 1983, Thor 337 (Walter Simonson's first issue as writer and full artist) was published, and in comics shops locally, demand instantly outweighed supply. Comics were still widely available in traditional outlets (they tended to arrive 3–4 weeks later), and I recall that one local collector bought every Thor 337 he could find from traditional newsstand outlets.

In 1991, the publisher Harvey revived Tom & Jerry in a handful of titles. In the fine print of the solicitations, I found that these comics were going to include reprints of MGM-character stories by the great Carl Barks. I am a Barks fan, so I made a mental note to buy them. When the time came for them to be published, they didn't show up at my LCS (I guess the owner didn't read the fine print). I wasn't going to miss those comics, so I started checking local newsstand outlets. I found them, IIRC, in a local grocery store. I am pleased that the copies in my collection now are newsstand copies.

After the Jurassic Park movie, Topps published a series of mini-series adapting and extending the movie story. Some of these featured scripts by Steve Englehart, a favorite of mine. In 1995, these Englehart-written stories were reprinted in the title Return to Jurassic Park. Even though I had the original printings of the stories, as an Englehart fan, I also wanted the reprints. Apparently because the comics were reprints, my LCS didn't order any copies. Once again, I resorted to traditional outlets. This time, I found the comics in a locally owned bookstore (the big national chains had not yet come to town). Once again, I am pleased that the copies in my collection are newsstand copies.

So, as late as 1995, I can testify that newsstand comics were available locally. From conversations with dealers, it's my impression that throughout the 1990s, newsstand copies were available in WaldenBooks and B Dalton's, and into the 2000s in Borders bookstores.

I don't believe comics are selling more units now than they did in the heyday of newsstand distribution. Sales per issue these days tend to be in the tens of thousands, maybe cracking 100,000 for a heavily promoted event. Back in the 1970s, I remember looking at sales figures in Statements of Ownership. Flagship titles tended to sell around 250,000 per issue, and titles sinking toward 100,000 were often canceled. I think what saves the industry now, with lower sales, are: (1) per-issue prices that have grown faster than inflation, (2) efficiency of distribution (specifically, non-returnability of unsold copies), and (3) licensing fees, particularly from Hollywood movie studios.

monidaw1 wrote:
I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil

Those spinner racks certainly weren't designed to preserve the comics in NM condition. I think minimization of floor space was the idea back then. Still, pleasant memories, huh?
Xylob
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 9:35:32 AM

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outcast wrote:
monidaw1 wrote:
I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil

Those spinner racks certainly weren't designed to preserve the comics in NM condition. I think minimization of floor space was the idea back then. Still, pleasant memories, huh?
I grew up in a small town too, but fortunately the Mini-Mart, 7-11, and local book store ("Books-A-Go-Go!") all had the comics on the stands similar to what B&N uses to display their magazines these days - my first comics are in pretty decent shape considering (no spinner rack fold damage!).

and don't get me wrong on the whole direct vs. newsie as variant issue - when I initially found and started using CCL it was the first thing I asked for. I was told that it was 'on the list' and that it was explained that it would be difficult to implement. After years of using the software/database and later becoming an approver I now appreciate exactly how much of a logistical nightmare it would be to get the newsies into the database as bona fide variants.
Wall
Frankly, this is something that should have been put in place from the beginning. At this point it's kinda like giving yourself another spleen and appendix.
You wouldn't happen to be a super duper ultra 1337 coder would you?

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yourplace2
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 10:34:12 AM

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Xylob wrote:
outcast wrote:
monidaw1 wrote:
I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil

Those spinner racks certainly weren't designed to preserve the comics in NM condition. I think minimization of floor space was the idea back then. Still, pleasant memories, huh?
I grew up in a small town too, but fortunately the Mini-Mart, 7-11, and local book store ("Books-A-Go-Go!") all had the comics on the stands similar to what B&N uses to display their magazines these days - my first comics are in pretty decent shape considering (no spinner rack fold damage!).

and don't get me wrong on the whole direct vs. newsie as variant issue - when I initially found and started using CCL it was the first thing I asked for. I was told that it was 'on the list' and that it was explained that it would be difficult to implement. After years of using the software/database and later becoming an approver I now appreciate exactly how much of a logistical nightmare it would be to get the newsies into the database as bona fide variants.
Wall
Frankly, this is something that should have been put in place from the beginning. At this point it's kinda like giving yourself another spleen and appendix.
You wouldn't happen to be a super duper ultra 1337 coder would you?


Those SPINNER racks are still being used. Go into your major grocery store chains that sell everything (books, movies, furnature, etc.) There is one there with comics.

Adding the NEWSTANDS should not be a major hardship or project. It should be a copy and paste, item per item as it comes up and is submitted, just like the variants are done today. Alot of the things I read today are coming out with 8-10 variant covers, some even more (WALKING DEAD #100 has 13 variants at least-guessing though). Stop thinking that to do this, you need to have many people doing it constantly minute by minute with researching all the possible comics with newstand covers. ADD THEM AS COLLECTORS FIND THEM. Only thing that is different is the price. It is way to easy!

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Thundercron
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 12:17:46 PM

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yourplace2 wrote:
Xylob wrote:
outcast wrote:
monidaw1 wrote:
I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil

Those spinner racks certainly weren't designed to preserve the comics in NM condition. I think minimization of floor space was the idea back then. Still, pleasant memories, huh?
I grew up in a small town too, but fortunately the Mini-Mart, 7-11, and local book store ("Books-A-Go-Go!") all had the comics on the stands similar to what B&N uses to display their magazines these days - my first comics are in pretty decent shape considering (no spinner rack fold damage!).

and don't get me wrong on the whole direct vs. newsie as variant issue - when I initially found and started using CCL it was the first thing I asked for. I was told that it was 'on the list' and that it was explained that it would be difficult to implement. After years of using the software/database and later becoming an approver I now appreciate exactly how much of a logistical nightmare it would be to get the newsies into the database as bona fide variants.
Wall
Frankly, this is something that should have been put in place from the beginning. At this point it's kinda like giving yourself another spleen and appendix.
You wouldn't happen to be a super duper ultra 1337 coder would you?


Those SPINNER racks are still being used. Go into your major grocery store chains that sell everything (books, movies, furnature, etc.) There is one there with comics.

Adding the NEWSTANDS should not be a major hardship or project. It should be a copy and paste, item per item as it comes up and is submitted, just like the variants are done today. Alot of the things I read today are coming out with 8-10 variant covers, some even more (WALKING DEAD #100 has 13 variants at least-guessing though). Stop thinking that to do this, you need to have many people doing it constantly minute by minute with researching all the possible comics with newstand covers. ADD THEM AS COLLECTORS FIND THEM. Only thing that is different is the price. It is way to easy!


Are you talking about the old school, metal spinner racks? I haven't seen those since the early 90's, so I'm surprised you say they are still being used--unless you're talking about the newer, wood and plastic racks some bookstores use. I'm fortunate to have found a circa early-1970s comic book rack on Craigslist for $75, so I can relive my memories daily.
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monidaw1 wrote:
As a kid growing up there was a 7-11, a local gas station/convienience store and a drug store selling comics, I presume Newsstand editions. That was just in my one small country town with similar distribution through all the towns in the area.

From the 90's to now I don't know of anywhere between Richmond and Lynchburg selling comics. That's a rather huge area. Humongous even. I wasn't even sure they were still being produced and I still can't wrap my head around how they could possibly be selling more now with such limited distribution as they did back then with a spin rack everywhere you shopped. Entire generations of children are now growing up never even seeing a comic book or at least not seeing any that aren't old and tattered. If you don't have a family member wanting to take you into the big city to one of the few B&M's still in existence you'd never have exposure to them.

I can see there being a shortage of high grade Newsstands from the 80's and feel free to blame me since I'm one of the one's who thumbed every corner of every book in every pouch on the spin rack trying to make sure I didn't miss any and even trying to hide a last copy of something in a less obvious spot until I could go walk a dog or cut some grass to get another 40 cent to buy it. Devil



I fail to see how publishers can not see this as an obvious problem. I have two subscribers to new books and they say their nearest comic shop is 100 miles away. With the popularity of movies like the Avengers there should be no reason for publishers to think they can't sell comics at the newsstand. It's ironic that everyone (pretty much) in America can get their Avengers movie fix, even if it's just the local grocery store selling the DVD even if there's no movie theater in town. You're also guaranteed to get yourself subject to all the marketing tie-ins no matter where you live. But when it comes to the comics, you're out of luck--and comics were the SOURCE MATERIAL for all this merchandising!!
outcast
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 1:07:17 PM
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yourplace2 wrote:
Those SPINNER racks are still being used. Go into your major grocery store chains that sell everything (books, movies, furnature, etc.) There is one there with comics.
.
.
.
This is starting to look like a regional difference. Here in my part of the Central Time Zone, comics have vanished from grocery stores and convenience stores. The end occurred pretty recently, too. Last year, I found a nicely stocked spinner rack at a drugstore, just as the drugstore was about to go out of business. Earlier this year, I saw some newsstand versions of Amazing Spider-Man, along with children's titles like Scooby-Doo, at a grocery store a half-mile from where I live. Within weeks, even those meager pickings were gone. Since then, I've been all over my metropolitan area, looking for comics. The only outlets still carrying them are comics shops, national chain bookstores, and national chain toy stores (oh, and one grocery store with a nice selection of 2011 comics).
Xylob
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 1:54:54 PM

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The only place I've seen comics outside the LCS around here is the action figure aisle at TRU and Barnes & Noble.

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outcast
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 1:54:56 PM
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Thundercron wrote:
I fail to see how publishers can not see this as an obvious problem.
I don't disagree, but what is the solution? I have read comments by Jenette Khan saying that in her early years in comics (late '70s), DC was printing and distributing (via newsstand distribution) four copies to sell just one. I have read comments by Jim Shooter that, again in the late '70s, Marvel was very close to going out of business, and that the Star Wars adaptation, with its numerous reprintings, saved them. In both cases, I get the strong impression that, if newsstand distribution had been their only distribution channel, they could not have survived the '80s. Consider publishers like Harvey, Charlton, and Gold Key/Whitman; their comics didn't sell in comics shops as well as Marvel and DC, and none of them survived the '80s.

The efficiencies of direct distribution (along with licensing fees and higher inflation-adjusted cover prices) make it possible for publishers to continue publishing. In today's market, newsstand distribution appears to be a drag on business for publishers (I read earlier this year that Marvel has given up altogether on newsstand distribution [they do still distribute returnable comics to national chain bookstores]).

Thundercron wrote:
I have two subscribers to new books and they say their nearest comic shop is 100 miles away. With the popularity of movies like the Avengers there should be no reason for publishers to think they can't sell comics at the newsstand. It's ironic that everyone (pretty much) in America can get their Avengers movie fix, even if it's just the local grocery store selling the DVD even if there's no movie theater in town. You're also guaranteed to get yourself subject to all the marketing tie-ins no matter where you live. But when it comes to the comics, you're out of luck--and comics were the SOURCE MATERIAL for all this merchandising!!
Even when a dime bought what a dollar now buys, a lot of kids could come up with a dime; coming up with $3 today is harder. When comics were printed on newsprint, energy was cheap, and government subsidization of shipping of periodicals was greater, publishers could efficiently put a lot of comics in a lot of locations; heavier comics, higher energy costs, and lower shipping subsidies make it difficult to continue hitting as many locations. And the forms in which the public are willing to consume entertainment seem to have changed; comics' static images seem to be less compelling to many than the moving images offered in theaters and even on television. I hate to acknowledge it, but economic factors that permitted saturation distribution of comics may not exist anymore. The fifties are gone, and they're not coming back.

Consider also how thin the current product tends to be. For $3, you can buy a comic that gives you ten minutes of reading pleasure, and a fraction of a story. Comics ca. 1980 were good for 25 minutes, often containing a whole story; comics ca. 1950 (with 48 interior pages and less advertising) were probably good for 45 minutes and three to six stories. It's not surprising that fans are the only audience now for this mode of entertainment.
monidaw1
Posted: Thursday, December 06, 2012 4:12:23 PM

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After years of using the software/database and later becoming an approver I now appreciate exactly how much of a logistical nightmare it would be to get the newsies into the database as bona fide variants.


That's where I get lost at. It seems as simple as just letting people submit a variant here and there and captioning it Newsstand Edition. Then you've got the original listing and the Newsstand. Then those who want to ignore it get to ignore it and keep on listing the same way. One's who want the distinction will use it and in many cases if it's allowing for a higher retail price then they may delist existing copys and move them over voluntarily. I looked up a book yesterday I'd been loading for 50-60 cents in the past here that Denver's asking over $12 for the Newsstand copy of. Even if they're overvaluing it by double then continuing to offer it here for 60 cent is just plain stupid. That's costing CCL money and without an trustworthy reference source for us to harvest them out of the pile as we load them which the extra listing would provide, then many are just going to keep slipping through the cracks. Also, listing it here at the higher price might look bad mixed in a herd of lower priced books when comparing prices.

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