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What are the best comic book titles to buy for investment??? plz help Options
huntsman
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2012 11:48:40 AM

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oakman29
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2012 7:50:55 PM

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Think

"You want me to trade you my comic for small rectangular sheets of green paper with the images of dead white men?"

4saken1
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2012 8:01:55 PM

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Comic Books are not a good investment. Better to invest your money in stocks!

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oakman29
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2012 8:41:02 PM

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For starters,books in my sig. line are a pretty safe bet on investment grade comics.Big Hug

"You want me to trade you my comic for small rectangular sheets of green paper with the images of dead white men?"

BurningDoom
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2012 10:33:52 PM

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Golden Age and Silver Age (1930s-1960s) issues, preferably key issues; which is a long list.

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SpidermanGeek
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 11:12:58 AM

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Lol.. comics as an investment.

Basically, anything published in the last 30 years will more than likely be either worthless, or never really go up in value (nothing "investment worthy" anyway).

Best bet is to start attending auctions and try and find golden age books.

You could always get lucky and find a gold mine at a garage sale, but the chances of that happening are slim to none.

Don't ever expect to find a diamond in the rough for a "steal" at any comic book convention on even swap meets.

Typically, people trying to sell comics at these places, know what they have and actually try to gouge you on it thinking that it's "worth" a lot more than it actually is.

Just cause a "guide" says something is worth so much, doesn't automatically make it the "retail price".

Don't ever try to sell "valuable comics" to a comic book shop. These are businesses looking to make a profit. If you saw something valued in a guide for 1,000$, you'll be lucky to find a comic book shop that will offer you even half of that.

In short though, take 4saken1's advice.. look elsewhere for something to invest in.



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Mick77
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 1:36:51 PM

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I'm investing in my kids. That way when I'm old they will be smart enough or athletic enough to pay my way



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Thundercron
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 2:24:34 PM

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I love these threads. It's basically members of the forums telling a newbie to go away.

There's lots of stuff to invest in. Buying new comics isn't the way to go, unless you get in on the floor with a current "hot" title. Those situations are hard to predict, but sometimes you can get word of a book selling out and then buying up some copies from somewhere else, and flipping those. But those books only hold short-term value, typically.

Other members are right in saying most stuff from the 1980's on up are not good long-term investments. The exception would be in locating super-high grade books for the 1980's, submitting them to be professionally graded, and then *hoping* it comes back what you expect. It's a gamble that would cost a lot of money over time, require a lot of experience in pre-grading, but could pay off eventually (as it has for others).

For investing in non-graded books, I'd focus on the early bronze age to silver age. Golden age books are just too spendy for most people. Most high-grade books from this period (Silver Age) are still "affordable", and will still increase in value over time, as most of the characters they feature are still relevant today. That's a key point, too: relevancy. As long as these characters are popular today, the older books will still be sought after. I take issue with so many Golden Age books in Overstreet being valued in the thousands of dollars when the book in question has very little demand on the back issue market. Personally, I've never met anyone (not talking online, here) that actively collects Golden Age books. The main reason is that most people I know have no connection to those books. Seems Overstreet deems them valuable for no other reson than they're old.

One last comment I want to address:


SpidermanGeek wrote:
Lol.. comics as an investment.


Don't ever expect to find a diamond in the rough for a "steal" at any comic book convention on even swap meets.




REALLY?? Where do you live attend and conventions--because I don't ever want to live there if that's what the market is like. In my area, I CONSTANTLY find valuable books for cheap. Recently, I spent $2 on a Spectacular Spider-Man #11 35-Cent Variant, and sold it here for $150. In fact, ALL of the 35-Cent Variants I've ever owned--and then sold--were acquired from dealers who didn't know what they had. I sold a Mad Love (Harley Quinn) book for $25 I got for .33. Both copies of Avatar Illustrated Summer 1998 (first preview appearance of Goon) I have were purchased for less than $1.00 each. Last week I picked up Thunderstrike #24 (last issue) for $2.50. The last copy I had in my store sold for $15.00

I could go on, but I'm just illustrating that--at least around here--bargains are EVERYWHERE. Suppose I can thank the depressed economy...
SpidermanGeek
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 3:24:31 PM

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Location: Orleans, Ontario
Ottawa Canada. The comic book scene is practically non-existant here. the closest conventions are Montreal and Toronto and I've never found anything worthwhile at these. All of the sellers are LCS's, so any valuable book is already identified and priced accordingly. We have a monthly trade show around here, but it seems like it's always the same 12 people trying to get rid of their crappy stock and asking way too much for it.

Comic Books really aren't big here. My LCS owner even told me that if it wasn't for toys, statues and Anime/Manga stuff... he coudln't afford staying open. Comic Books are a small percentage of his business and he doesn't deal in back issues (they don't buy old issues from people at all, not for cash anyway. It would have to be a sought after book and even then, he'd offer half the worth if you took it in store credit, or else he MIGHT consider giving you 30% in cash value.

It sucks. That's why I'm driving to C2E2 in April to hopefully get a better, more positive Convention Experience.



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oakman29
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 4:35:15 PM

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Thundercron wrote:
I love these threads. It's basically members of the forums telling a newbie to go away.

There's lots of stuff to invest in. Buying new comics isn't the way to go, unless you get in on the floor with a current "hot" title. Those situations are hard to predict, but sometimes you can get word of a book selling out and then buying up some copies from somewhere else, and flipping those. But those books only hold short-term value, typically.

Other members are right in saying most stuff from the 1980's on up are not good long-term investments. The exception would be in locating super-high grade books for the 1980's, submitting them to be professionally graded, and then *hoping* it comes back what you expect. It's a gamble that would cost a lot of money over time, require a lot of experience in pre-grading, but could pay off eventually (as it has for others).

For investing in non-graded books, I'd focus on the early bronze age to silver age. Golden age books are just too spendy for most people. Most high-grade books from this period are still "affordable", and will still increase in value over time, as most of the characters they feature are still relevant today. That's a key point, too: relevancy. As long as these characters are popular today, the older books will still be sought after. I take issue with so many Golden Age books in Overstreet being valued in the thousands of dollars when the book in question has very little demand on the back issue market. Personally, I've never met anyone (not talking online, here) that actively collects Golden Age books. The main reason is that most people I know have no connection to those books. Seems Overstreet deems them valuable for no other reson than they're old.

One last comment I want to address:


SpidermanGeek wrote:
Lol.. comics as an investment.


Don't ever expect to find a diamond in the rough for a "steal" at any comic book convention on even swap meets.




REALLY?? Where do you live attend conventions--because I don't ever want to live there if that's what the market is like. In my area, I CONSTANTLY find valuable books for cheap. Recently, I spent $2 on a Spectacular Spider-Man #11 35-Cent Variant, and sold it here for $150. In fact, ALL of the 35-Cent Variants I've ever owned--and then sold--were acquired from dealers who didn't know what they had. I sold a Mad Love (Harley Quinn) book for $25 I got for .33. Both copies of Avatar Illustrated Summer 1998 (first preview appearance of Goon) I have were purchased for less than $1.00 each. Last week I picked up Thunderstrike #24 (last issue) for $2.50. The last copy I had in my store sold for $15.00

I could go on, but I'm just illustrating that--at least around here--bargains are EVERYWHERE. Suppose I can thank the depressed economy...

Rolling on the Floor it's funny how everyone tries to push people to invest in anything but comics around here,I could liquidate my collection tomorrow and have a half million dollars.The key is to learn how to pick the right books,the keys etc. I can think of many 80s comics that are selling for very high prices,TMNT #1 anyone? Don't Tell Anyone

"You want me to trade you my comic for small rectangular sheets of green paper with the images of dead white men?"

SpidermanGeek
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 5:24:51 PM

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lol. and i've been collectin for 20 years and if i liquidated my collection I'd pocket about 1,500 bucks.



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oakman29
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 5:47:15 PM

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There's 70K in my sig. line alone.Daydreaming

"You want me to trade you my comic for small rectangular sheets of green paper with the images of dead white men?"

heavyearly2000
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 6:01:56 PM

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I feel that the question huntsman asked is too vague to even answer. Are you looking for a long or short term investment? Are you looking to grab a stack of new titles and flip them in 6 months or are you looking for the next one million dollar issue? Thundercron makes an excellent point concerning Golden Age material, if there is limited interest in that era now how can there much or any demand for it in 20 years?



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4saken1
Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012 11:18:56 PM

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oakman29 wrote:
it's funny how everyone tries to push people to invest in anything but comics around here,I could liquidate my collection tomorrow and have a half million dollars.The key is to learn how to pick the right books,the keys etc. I can think of many 80s comics that are selling for very high prices,TMNT #1 anyone? Don't Tell Anyone


Well, I guess if you have the innate ability to pick 1 in 1,000 odds that a comic purchased today will be worth that much 20+ years from now, then you should probably go for it! Rolling on the Floor The reality of it is, if you are looking to invest in comics, very few of the books you buy will actually be worth significantly worth more than you paid for them in the future.

In simple terms, if you invest $1,000 in comics today, you probably won't end up with 300 copies which are the equivalent value of what Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #1 is worth. In fact, you're much more likely to be stuck with 300 copies of something akin to X-Force (1991) #1. Sure, there's the small chance that you might get lucky, but it is extremely unlikely that the amount you shell out for your initial investment is worth more than what you cash out for in the end.

In all seriousness, I stand behind my previous statement - comic books are not a good investment!!! If you know about a comic that is getting made into a movie before 99% of the rest of the world does, that's another story, but for the most part, it's a losing proposition! There are tons of other ways to make money that have much better returns.

ComicVortex

Current specials:

Get 30% Off Select Comics
For every comic you purchase from our 'Bargain Bin' (those priced $1 or less), another comic purchased over $1 will be $30% off (refunded via PayPal). eg. If you purchase 10 'Bargain Bin' books, then 10 books purchased that are each over $1 will recieve this refund, etc.

Free Shipping

Every domestic order of 25 or more comics gets FREE SHIPPING (Media Mail). Though I can't provide Free Shipping on foreign orders, we do offer a $5 refund on postage for purchases of 25 or more comics to foreign countries or a $10 refund if you buy 50 comics (again, foreign orders only).

ocphil
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 3:50:16 AM

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Comic books are a great investment-if you can pick the winners. Check the 41st Overstreet Price guide.
Action #1 in 1970 was $300. Now, $1.4 million,
Whiz #2 $300. Now $100,000.
Conan the Barbarian #1, 15cents, Now $475.
Green Lantern #76 65 cents, today $2,500.


Your problem is twofold.
Which comics to buy. In general new comics are worthless. meaning anything from 1975 on. This is because they're too many of them (people started collecting) and not enough demand.

Second, the high prices. Can you really afford to "invest" tens of thousands in one comic book? And will it grow exponentially in price in 40 years? The comic book is disappearing. No one reads them. A good book in 1944 sold a million copies. In the 1970s a good book sold 300,000 copies. Today maybe 50,000 copies a month. Will there be any collectors alive in thirty years to buy your comics?
Let me put it this way. When I was a kid, I looked at the prices in the Overstreet guide issue 7 and laughed. Who would pay a thousand dollars for a comic book? Hahaha.
Will You be laughing at how high prices are in thirty years or how the market has crashed?
If you ask a financial advisor they will tell you don't put more than 5% of your portfolio in any one stock.
I still have 5 copies of Epic Illustrated#1 in a box because I was sure I was going to make a mint. I should have bought Green Lantern #76 instead.

If you are serious, golden age comics and key silver age. Even then you don't know which ones. But you can guess. The trouble is everyone else knows and the first appearances of the most famous heroes are already highly priced.
drakesfuture
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 10:32:33 AM

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Guys, at the risk of sounding douchey, I'm not sure you are working with a decent definition of investment.

In my mind, comics are a wonderful long term investment---the key phrase is long term.

In the short term, it is incredibly difficult to make any real profit off comics. It requires a ton of work, knowledge and luck to do it. More than most people have.



But long term...well, I'll just share my own story and not speak for others.

I had a very mediocre comic collection. But over the years I am picking up lotsa stuff. Spending $10 here, $1 there, $75 here.....until I have a fairly impressive stock of comics and related merchandise and getting more impressive by the week.
And....if I sold it all at once it would be worth far more than the sum of it's parts.

For instance, you can probable, if you are patient, pick up every issue of the original X-Force run for 25 cents a pop (or less in some cases). But if you sold the entire run on ebay or craigslist or at a show or something, you would probably get considerably more than the equivalent of 25 cents a comic.
Plus, you don't feel the $10 expenditure. You know what I mean. All those small expenditures just get absorbed over a lifetime, but when you finally decide to sell, well the payout is something you will feel.


Any ways.......if you are patient and just treat your collecton like a true investment----by continually pumping money into it and nurturing it over time.....you WILL have a payout at the end.
Dementia5
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 11:10:08 AM

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4saken1 wrote:
oakman29 wrote:
it's funny how everyone tries to push people to invest in anything but comics around here,I could liquidate my collection tomorrow and have a half million dollars.The key is to learn how to pick the right books,the keys etc. I can think of many 80s comics that are selling for very high prices,TMNT #1 anyone? Don't Tell Anyone


Well, I guess if you have the innate ability to pick 1 in 1,000 odds that a comic purchased today will be worth that much 20+ years from now, then you should probably go for it! Rolling on the Floor The reality of it is, if you are looking to invest in comics, very few of the books you buy will actually be worth significantly worth more than you paid for them in the future.

In simple terms, if you invest $1,000 in comics today, you probably won't end up with 300 copies which are the equivalent value of what Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #1 is worth. In fact, you're much more likely to be stuck with 300 copies of something akin to X-Force (1991) #1. Sure, there's the small chance that you might get lucky, but it is extremely unlikely that the amount you shell out for your initial investment is worth more than what you cash out for in the end.

In all seriousness, I stand behind my previous statement - comic books are not a good investment!!! If you know about a comic that is getting made into a movie before 99% of the rest of the world does, that's another story, but for the most part, it's a losing proposition! There are tons of other ways to make money that have much better returns.


+1

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Dementia5
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 11:15:22 AM

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SpidermanGeek wrote:
Lol.. comics as an investment.

...

Just cause a "guide" says something is worth so much, doesn't automatically make it the "retail price".

...

In short though, take 4saken1's advice.. look elsewhere for something to invest in.


QFT.

In highlight, probably the best indicator is to see what the eBay AUCTIONS are bringing in for comics... NOT THE BUY IT NOW issues; e.g. you will find plenty of Deadpool issues at inflated prices sitting on the virtual shelf for months on end.

But as an investment strategy? Akin to the lottery nowadays.

"We make a pretty good team, even if we don't work together." - My son





We put the "RP" into RPG!

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drakesfuture
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 11:45:49 AM

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Dementia5 wrote:
SpidermanGeek wrote:
Lol.. comics as an investment.

...

Just cause a "guide" says something is worth so much, doesn't automatically make it the "retail price".

...

In short though, take 4saken1's advice.. look elsewhere for something to invest in.


QFT.

In highlight, probably the best indicator is to see what the eBay AUCTIONS are bringing in for comics... NOT THE BUY IT NOW issues; e.g. you will find plenty of Deadpool issues at inflated prices sitting on the virtual shelf for months on end.

But as an investment strategy? Akin to the lottery nowadays.



This just isn't true.

sure, if you are hoping to find some hidden treasure and flip it for a fortune, then you are truly out of luck in 99.99999999999% of cases.

But if you are willing to be patient and build a decent collection piecemeal over a number of years, then comics are an almost sure thing investment.

You will ALWAYS find a buyer, and if you are patient you will ALMOST ALWAYS sell at a better price than you bought.
Patience is the key word.


Just one "for instance". Warp comics. Most people don't even give a crap what that is. Sold singly, I couldn't sell 'em for a penny.
But I bought the whole run over the years for pennies myself. Probably spent 5 dollars on the whole run.
Sold the entire run (because I had the whole run) for 12 bucks a while back. Thats a more than 200% return on investment and all it took was patience....and 5 bucks.



lol...and now I am rebuying that series....because I am a completist idiot. Someone stop me.
Dementia5
Posted: Saturday, March 03, 2012 11:58:59 AM

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drakesfuture wrote:


You will ALWAYS find a buyer, and if you are patient you will ALMOST ALWAYS sell at a better price than you bought.
Patience is the key word.


Just one "for instance". Warp comics. Most people don't even give a crap what that is. Sold singly, I couldn't sell 'em for a penny.
But I bought the whole run over the years for pennies myself. Probably spent 5 dollars on the whole run.
Sold the entire run (because I had the whole run) for 12 bucks a while back. Thats a more than 200% return on investment and all it took was patience....and 5 bucks.



Not to take away from your success, DF, but no investment strategist with a clear conscience would recommend that level of patience to someone who hopes to get any significant return on such an acquisition.

Most would rather invest in a mutual fund or IRA at 13% yield on market commodities numbering much higher than a lot of 12 or so issues at cover price. Now, if you are suggesting gluttoning the market (acquiring all existing known copies of a book) to introduce artificial inflation or interest that is one thing, but that requires more patience than I'll assume the OP has.

So, yes, 200% sounds mighty for a few issues at near cover price, but the impression I'm getting is the OP is looking for that magic bullet that will bring in hundreds and hundreds of dollars for that "prized" issue; based on the history of posts there is a whiff of speculator with such inquiries. He has probably vanished anyhow, so we'll probably never know.

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